= | Pea: =e 23 =*

a = Doe ea §

LA

cs =x _—4

MAGNOLIA METAL CO.

Owners and Sole Manufacturers.

FOR SALE BY ALL DEALERS 266 and 267 West St., NEW YORK.

Votumg XXX

IIETAL.

CHICAGO: Traders’ Building. LONDON: 49 Queen Vieloria St., B.¢.

Beware of Fraudulent |mitations

2h.

~_er

H.C. FRICK COKE Co

o eee

Post Office, PITTSBURG, PA.

Mines and Ovens in the Connellsville Coke Region, Penna.

a CENUINE CONNELLSVILLE COKE

leadquarters

a esteeeec

lisville Coke (substitute for

Jaily Capacity

domestic purposes. 13,500 Ovens. 1

for manufacturing and

imthracite Coal)

g the Region. urnished on application.

a2” Direct connections with all Railroads enterin

juotations, Freight Rates, Pamphlets giving full information, promptly f

0,000 tons of Coke,

CLEVELAND, O. DE

Moore’s Anti-Friction

DIFFERENTIAL

B Adjustable Automatic Brake. Self sustaining at every point. Highest Efficiency

4 A New Movement.

2 A Perpetual Compound Lever. Powerful, Simple and Durable yw Light, Compact and Strong. NINE SIZES. Y Y Half Ton to Ten Tons Capacity. ALSO :

HAND POWER CRANES, WINCHES, &c.

@ Moore Manufacturing Co.,

CLEVELAND, O.

_ IIE IRON IRADE REVIEW

CHICAGO, ILL.

CEMBER 1897.

Forster, WATERBURY & (0.

INCORPORATED. PIC IRON, STEEL, ORE, COKE.

30,

636-638 Rookery, CHICAGO.

Tee CHICAGO SCREWCO.

mule

TUPREERERS SGRIE

Wey

94-108 W.WaswinctonSr. CHicaco

DICKMAN & MACKENZIE,

CLEVELAND, CHICAGO, 71 Atwater Bidg. 1224 Rookery Bldg Mining properties examined. Ores sampled at mines, furnaces and all lake ports.

General analyses of Ores, Slags, Metals, Fuel Foundry Materials and Products, etc.

CHEMISTS AND ENCINEERS.

NUMBER 52

SEND FOR CATALOGUE.

CAHALL SALES DEPARTMENT, Bank of Commerce Buliding, PITTSBURG, PA. 146 Taylor Building, New York City, WN. Y. The Rookery,”’ Chicago, Ii. 542 Drexel Bidg., Philadelphia, Pa. 1016 Tremont Bidg, Bosten.

ENTERPRISE BOILER COMPANY

YOUNCSTOWN, O.

Draught Stacks, Blast Furnaces and Heavy Plate Work a Specialty.

Write for Estimates.

METAL STAMPING,

We do all kinds ot SMALL STAMPING and FORMING, from Steel, Iron or Brass, from your Dies or we can make Dies for you.

Send sample or sketch for price.

THE OLIVER P. CLAY CO.

416 Arcade, Cleveland, Ohio.

won eared Lun OTA : Bi Dynamo ST. LOUIS. MO Fiat Creve: BELTING? ~Wew York Boston. Phila Jeiphia. Cleveland Tool and Supply Co.. Agts,. Cleveland, 0.

‘‘ Metallurgy of Cast Iron,’ Price $3.

POWER TRANSMISSION

WA: JONES FOUNDRY MACHINE

So. JEFFERSON ST

I-99

CHM(AGO :

APOLLO GALVANIZED IRON.

Saves men’s time because it is workable.

Return to the jobber at his ex- pense any sheet, or part of a sheet, that has, or develops in working, any defect whatever.

Apollo Iron and Steel Company, Pittsburgh, Pa.

See large Advertisement of

B. F. STURTEVANT CO.,

Boston, Mass., On Page 24,

TURNBUCKLES.

Cleveland Gity Forge & Iron Co.,

CLEVELAND. O.

The AB C of Iron, Now $1.

WORKS, SHAKUN. MINES, CLEARFIELD CO., PA.

James V. Rose.

. PROPRIETOR...

SHARON FIRE BRICK WORKS,

Contractor in Fire Brick Construction. Manufacturer of High Grade Fire Brick.

ANALYSIS: Brick. Rock Clay. SILICA, 5450. | siLica, 47.00. ALUMINA, 44.20. ALUMINA, 39.00, LOSS ON IGN, .05. | L088 ON IGN,13.20 IRON, 15. TRON, -12, SHARON, PA.

cae AND CHILLED

BRASS AND COPPER Castingaee :

BLOWERS, FANS, ENGINES.

THE UPSON NUT CoO., Cleveland, O.

MACHINE AND CARRIAGE BOLTS,

_ Kee WACMEDRDS ETO

- MANUFACTURERS OF «. - « HOT

FORCED AND COLD PUNCHED

Cataincuna and Prices an Annlication.

NUTS. LAC SCREWS, BOLT

ae “HE IRON ‘IRADE REVIEW.

[December 30, 1897

Draft Stacks, Galvanizing Pots, Tank Cars.

WM. B. POLLOCK & CO.

Wit’ inquiry please give ad. No. 6.

YOUNGSTOWN, O.

Blast Furnaces, Steel Plants, Boilers, Tanks, etc.

FORCE

in the

GATES ROCK & ORE BREAKER.

It is unequaled in economy, wearing quali- tiesand crushing capacity. Over 4,000 in ase. Write for catalogue,

GATES IRON WORKS, écd'eisten wv.

CHICACO, ILL.

Miter, Wagoner & Bentley,

PIC IRON, STEEL,

Columbus; O., ae ~~ F oO be #* Chicago, I!1., Monadnoc g- St. Louis, Mo., Bank of Com. Bldg. COK E.

properly applied to our ore, placing it n condition to com- mand the highest market price, is found tothe best advantage

PATENT LIME-EXTRACTING

COMBINED.

Is the only lime-extracting Heater that Scale in Steam Boilers, removing a

Thoroughly Tested.

OVER 8,000 OF THEM IN DA

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE.

Stilwell - Bierce & Smith-Vaile

DAYTON, OHIO. ®- CHICAGO OFFICE, 63 S. Canal St.

—STILWELL’S—

HEATER ~ FILTER

from the water before it enters the boiler.

will prevent ll impurities

ILY USE.

Company,

Subscribe for the Iron T

rade Review, $3 per year.

Air Compressors.

We manufacture Air Compressors suitable for all kinds of work, and a variety covering every size, from the small Be't-driven Compressor for small shops and pumping small

uantities of water, up to the large Corliss Compound Compressors for the greatest manu- docturing or mining plants of the world. As an instance of the wid

Goal Cutters,

range covered by

Compressors of our make, we name the following that we have recent!y furnished, all of

Rock Drills. Channelers.

ite Co., Barre, Vt.,

a large number of pneumatic tools ; Works, Valdosta, Ga., for pumping water; the Manhattan Elevated R. R.Co., New York, for machine shop purposes; Walker Co., Electric Works, Cleveland, Ohio; Harrison Gran-

whom are equally distinguished in their line: - Newport News Shipbuilding Co., Newport News, Va.; Duplex Compressor for operating Hughes Bros. & Bangs, Bellevue, Del.; Valdosta Water

neumatic too's; L. L. Manning, Plainfield, N. J.,

Anaconda Copper Mining Co., Butte, Montana. y Our Catalogues give information on the subject of Air Compressors and other subjects

regarding the application of Compressed Air.

The Ingersoll-Sergeant Drill Company,

The Pohle Air Lift Pump.

Havemeyer Building, New York.

Marble Works; the

COFIPRESSORS Thoroughly up-to-date

market. Built on ? improved lines. ROCK PRILLS, AIR LIFT, PUMPS, ETC. Send for catalogue

(RAND DRILL CO.)

100 Broadway, New York. 1328 Monadnock Block, Chicage.

Steel Stamps and Stencils.

LEHARTY, J. H. & Co. Rubber Stamps Seals, Stencils, Automatic Check Punches and Numbering Machines. 92 Seneca St.

oO. TEXTOR, Chemistad Metallurzgist

Analyses made of Metals, Ores, Fuels and Sup- plies for Furnaces, Steel Works and Foundries.

Ores sampled at mines, furnaces and lake ports. |

Advice furnished to operators of Blast Furnaces Steel Works and Foundries. Mining properties reported upon. For 12 Years Chief Chemist to the Cleve- land Rolling Mill Co.

158 Superior St., CLEVELAND, O.

For every application of Compressed Air Power.

ALR COMPRESSORS asin ai conrssor Wis

26 Cortlandt St., NEW YORK.

We will send to Engineers and Business men, our circular No. 15, upon Air and Gas Compressors for all purposes and for any desired pressure and volume.

THE NORWALK IRON WORKS CO.

301 Water St., SO. NORWALK, CT.

Casut Aooness METALFAC-CHICAGO” AGC Cove

E.H.STROUD&CoO.

METAL FACTORS The Products oy and. hipyp lies foe | {RON STEEL TIN-PLATE BRASS COPPER-LEAD AND ZINC WORKS. 56 Latallettied cornet Lake trot : CHICAGO,!ILL.

Pickands, Brown & Co.

PIC IRON, IRON ORE

| .. AND... | FRICK COKE. | 929-939 ROOKERY BUILDING, CHICAGO.

F.A. EMMERTON,

| Analytical Chemist, | AND METALLURGIST.

Ores sampled at lake ports, mines and furnaces. | Mines and Metallurgical Processes examined. | Analyses made of Ores, Metals, Fuels, Railroad and Foundry Supplies, etc.

| 9 Bratenahi Building, CLEVELAND, 0O.

| noes tee =<°* OTYPE B CENTRAL Ri ic

| = 263271 Chane St. CLEVELAND, 9 0, ein } O00 ENGRAVING C ELECTROTYPING.

~

Cres

FOR ARTISTIC PRINTING WRITE

THE CLEVELAND PRINTING &

Wire Nail Machinery

30-INCH CHUCKINGC LATHES. RADIATOR LOOP BORING MACHINES.

Cc. K. PITTMAN,

SHIPPER OF

CGoal & Coke __Best Grades of Coke a Specialty.

en

THE IRON IRADE REVIEW

VoL_ume XXX.

CLEVELAND, O.

THE

WEEK IN IRON CIRCLES.

The year ends with larger bookings of iron and steel by the principal producers, and probably with a larger aggregate for the country, than has been

ss

known at any corresponding time in the history of the trade. It is a proof of the general belief that low prices are to continue, and that if advances come, as the new year is well along, they will be very moderate—to find so heavy a tonnage of steel rails, billets, sheet bars, wire rods, and of pig iron, as is now on order books. It is another indica-

tion of the more stable basis to which prices have

come, that in a month often marked by extrem: weakness, when many sellers act as though th year ahead would put the use of iron out of fashion, there has been in the closing weeks of 1897, only an occasional yielding of prices and that compara- tively trifling. The rail mills start upon 1898 wit] orders running into hundreds of thousands of tons, much of the business being taken at $18, Pittsburg, and S19 to $20, Cl icago. These orders have be

taken with no renewal of the disastrous war of last winter, though there has been, too, not a littl crossing of the territorial lines that were establish«

under the old pool regime. Efforts for the revival of the pool, on a price basis substantially that of to-day, but with an allotment feature that would insure to each mill a quota of business in nearest territory, are not abandoned, but there are some

obstacles that are not likely to be removed,

par

ticularly in the Central Western and Western situa- tion. Inthe past week the heaviest buying has been by the Lake Shore, the tonnage covering also the requirements of the P. & L. E., and the Nickel Plate. Car buying keeps up steadily and further contracts have been placed with rolling mills on this account. At the meeting of beam manufac- turers in New York this week, the Carnegie Steel Co., Ltd., Jones & Laughlins, Ltd., the Cambria Iron Co., Pencoyd Iron Works, Phoenix Iron Works and the Passaic Rolling Mill Co., were represented

Prospects are better than were: indicated a week ago, for some agreement. The Eastern mills, it would seem, will get most benefit from an allotment of tonnage and Western Pennsylvania interests can only be helped by a pool that would advance prices and still give them substantially the tonnage they are now getting on a competitive basis. While 1.10c Pittsburg, the present price, has been dis- cussed as the pool basis, it is more than likely that if the arrangement is made some advance will a

company it. A large amount of new work is be ing figured on, and Pittsburg has closed a 6,000 ton contract for New York bridge work. Chicago Drainage Canal awards are still pending

SS

and steel bars continue to be the weak factor in finished material, .g5c Pittsburg, for steel and gsc valley, for iron being quoted, with concessions on extras. The foundry pig iron situation is generally firm, apart from the concession of 25 cents on some Southern grades, in the expectation of stimu-

[ron

DECEMBER

30, 1897 CHICAGO, ILL. NUMBER 52

lating buying an n lifting prices. Some Alabama sellers have quoted gra rorge at $6 Ta) and No. 2 foundry at $7.25, but no large business has re sulted is vel Nort] eTn sS¢ lhe rs note consid- erable inquiry and a fair January business is counted on Bessemer pig iro! quiet and stationary Sales of the past few we it So.so for the first quarter cover a considerable portion of the output of certain valley furnaces for that period Present offers at that figure and a shade below for second quarter are not entertained Steel billets, with large amounts booked for the first quarter, are rm it $15, Pittsburg m with S1 5 ted by some ierTrs THE CLEVELAND DISTRICT.

Iron ore conferences for 1898 have begun, the first meeting being in session in Cleveland at this writing (Wednesday) All the old-range Bessemer producers are represented, including the new op erators of the Norrie and the Tilden Practically all the Mesabi range S represent d also through the interests that speak in the conference for old range companies, but the probability of any agre« ment that would include tl] Mesa s considered rather remot Whether the agreement of the Ml €iITquette Me 1 me (; Ve Tri | on ! ng companies produc ores can bi pe etuate er sp | S point tr ire facto t situation iting to al ffirmative answer; some opposite considerations appear. The agreement of the past year has been popular with furnacemen, in the guarantee of uni form prices it has given It has made no great money for the mining companies, but it has kept a bad situation from being worse. There are conflict ing views of the outcome of the present conference. One « nent, at least, wv prove less troublesome t nin ot ears The enormous consumption of Lake Superior ores should use little friction over the allotment limitations The present meet- ing being preliminary, and some prominent mem bers being absent, an adjournment will be taken

A firmer feeling in foundry iron and a Pig Tron. Guiet market Bessemer are noted among al p iron houses (ouotit I it vallev furnaces continue at So.>5 N ( ind $1 for No. 1 and some sales of small lots have been made The output of valley furnacs roducing Bessemer iron has been fairly well sold for the first quarter of 1898. and w Sc.s it ice was the price o most of this metal, that figure is refused by fur nacemen on second quarter business In the past week the market has been at a standstill There Ss some nau \ oO! Nel tnert ndry ind rorg¢ irons, with the latter quot to 4o cents above

Bessemer... ' 10 1 Valley Scotch No. 1 $10 656

No. 1 Strong Foundry 4 Valley Scotch No. 2 @104 No.2 Strong Foundry n Gray Forg« 9

No. 3 Foundry 2 Lake Supe r Charcoal

Heavy rail buying by the Lake Shore and 1

related lines is the principal local tonnage

i I &

Mate | . +* " : 7. ; : = in rolled products [here is some inquiry

ae = ee aa i : ws yy agricultural Works and orders are expected to De placed early in January lding outlook fot next spring is good local! nediate tonnag* is smal] Stee] s have ic ( ered in Cleveland, which would make the Pittsburg equiva | } ; » } | +} . ry’ L lent about s a ton below the osc basis lank

plates continue at ic, Pittsburg, and beams and channels at 1.100¢.

CHICAGO,

Orrice or The /ron Trade Review, | 1142 MONADNOCK BLOCK, Dec. 29.)

Christmas week has not shown a very active market so far as actual buying is concerned, but the number of inquiries received has increased considerably, pointing to the proba- bility of a large tonnage in January. In all the iron and steel trade consumers have been feeling the market

branches of

for the past several weeks, and dealers expect that the result of the inquiries will be a very heavy. buying movement shortly lf ] to ord-

after the firstof the year. The local mills are well fixed as ers for the first half of the new year, and are exceedingly in- dependent. President Gates, of the Illinois Steel Co., in a

recent interview stated that his company has business on hand and in sight for 800,000 tons of steel of various kinds, practically filling its order book for more than half the year. The company is in better shape financially than it has been

for a long time past, and it is fully expected that 1898 will be A goodly proportion of to the rail-

the best year that it has ever seen. the orders of the company are for rails, its sales roads in the past two months having been very heavy. Prices by

than they were 30 days ago, and the tendency is upward.

from $1.50 $2 a ton

on much of its output are higher

Pic Iron.—Sales of Southern iron last week were consider- ably in excess of those of the week before, and are large f this season of the year. The local fair quantity of iron, and express t

furnaces are also selling a 1emselves as very well satisfied with the trade coming to them, considering the sea- son. The number and size of inquiries is increasing, denot- ing a good business for next month, although it is hardly ex pected to come in much before the middle of the month. Prices are very firm, particularly for Northern irons, and have not been changed. Some of the smaller Southern fur- naces have been making reduced prices in this market in the past two weeks, and this has given the impression that the general market is weaker, causing some consumers to post- pone buying foratime. As arule, the larger Southern fur- naces are not making concessions, believing that after the first of the year they will not be necessary to secure trade.

We quote:

Lake Sup. Charcoal..... $12 50@13 00 South’n Coke No. $10 35@10 60 Local Coke Fdy. No. 1... 11 oo@11 50 | Southern No.1 Soft. 10 S5@I1I 25 Local Coke Fdy. No. 2... 10 so@11 o Southern No. 2 Soft...... 10 60@\ Local Coke Fdy. No. 3... 10 25@10 50 South’n Silveries ......... 11 25@11 5 Local Scotch Fdy. No. 1. 11 50@12 00 Jackson Co. Silveries... 12 50@14 Local Scotch Fdy. No. 2. 11 oo@11 50 Ohio Strong Softeners.. 12 oo@12 25

Alabama Car Wheel Malleable Bessemer Coke Bessemer

16 OO(HI7T 10 75@Il1 o

II 50(@12 00

Local Scotch Fdy. No. 3 South’n Coke No. 1.. South’n Coke No. 2

10 50@I1r 00 11 CO@II 25 10 60@Io0 55

Bars.—A fairly good tonnage was secured by the mills last

week, including several orders of quite large size. Car build-

ers continue to be large buyers of bars, and the inquiries now

in hand denote a continuance of this class of trade. Prices are quite firm, and are still made at 1.05¢ to 1.10c for com- mon iron, 1.15c to 1.20c for guaranteed, and 1.15¢ to 1.20c

for soft steel bars from strictly billet stock

Car Orvers.—No especially large orders were placed last week, but a number of small orders have been given out, and the inquiries coming in all the time promise a good business in the future.

RAILS AND TRACK large orders forrails in the past few weeks, filled for the first half of the The among those best posted in the trade, that rail orders for 18098 The

1) +}

mali

Supp.iges.—The local mill

and are now well

year. belief is current,

market

will be considerably in excess of those for 1897. is firm, and prices are being maintained by

Prices are as follows: Rails, $20 to $22.50, acc ording to speci-

fications: steel splice bars, 1.20c to 1.30c; track bolts, wit]

square nuts, 1.80c to 1.goc; hexagon nuts, 1.goc to 2c; spikes, 1.60c to 1.65¢. BILLETS AND Rops.—Some

territory by outside mills, but the local maker

business has been done in t

5 are well hiied with orders, and are selling only in small lots to fill in. Quo tations are unchanged at $17 for billets and $23 so for rod STRUCTURAL MATERIAL.—The Drainage Canal bridges has not yet been let, but probably will be week.

contract for the this No large contracts were given out last week, new ones came up to be bid upon. General business in small lots, considering the season, has been very good. The market is very firm and quotations are firmly maintained. Prices are

as follows: Beams, ts-inch and under, 1.2<c to

1.35c; 18, 20 .

and 24-inch, 1.35¢ to 1.45c; angles, 1.20 to 1.25¢;

piates, I.15C

THE IRON TRADi*. REVIEW.

[December 30, 1897

1.30c to 1.40c. Small lots from stock are

quoted at one-quarter to one-haif cent higher.

to 1.20c; tees,

PLATE No large sales were made last week, but a good tonnage of small orders was closed, and the demand keeps up ery well. Quotations are made as follows: Tank steel, 1.15c to 1.20c; flange steel, 1.40c to 1.45c; firebox steel, 1.85¢ to

SHEETS. —Seve good orders have been closed up in the week 1d the inquiries in hand denote a continuance of the

Small orders for delivery from store are frequent,

Quotations are made at

yusIness

2.201 No. 27 black and 80 and 7'3 per cent dis-

to 2.25c for

: count for galvanized.

MERCHANT STEEL.—Business continues to be very good, particularly in small orders from store, of which a good ton- nage was closed last week. The market is very firm. Prices follow: Open-hearth spring, tire and machinery steel, 1.65c to 1.75c; smooth finished machinery steel, 1.60c to 1.65c; smooth finished tire, 1.45c to 1.50c; tool steel, 5.50c to 7.50c;

ia) . na ward specials, [1c ana upwards

Scr -There is not much doing in this branch of the mar- ket, and dealers are not looking for a decided increase in ord- s before the idle of next month. Dealers’ selling prices

are as follows

Old iron rails, gross, $12 as: Axles, net...... $14 co@$i4 25 Old steel rails, long, gr.,10 so@ 10 Cast borings, net..... 400@ 425 Old steel rails, short a Wrought turnings, net 550@ 600 Old wheels, gross 10 50G@ Axle turnings, net 725@ 750 tailroad forge, net l Mixed steel, gross, .. - 7a Dealer's forge, net ) a Stove plates, net 600@ 625 No. 1 mill, net......... Soo@ 5850 Heavy meltingsteel gr. Soo@ 8 25 Heavy cast, net..... 775@ 3 Old iron splice b., met. 13 25@ 1375 Malleabie cast, net 5 00(a

PITTSBURG.

OFFICE OF The /rom Trade Review, l 807 TRADESMEN'S BUILDING, Dec . 3 Work tor

next year continues to appear in

and reports agree in estimating the present inquiry as the heaviest in many months. Str al work in the inquiry tage 1S isually | \ le resent business does not eep the mills in operatiot lhe Manhattan Viaduct wor} n New York comes to Pittsburg for plain matenal Rail business is steady and large and $18 mill is firmly held. The new wage scale of the Carnegie Steel Co., Ltd., is announced und i rtually a continuation of the present one

Pic Iron.—Bessemer pig is ruling at about $9.50, vallev and $10 to $10.15, Pittsburg with little interest apparent. Iron that might have caused a depression if brought forward has been cared for mainly through conversion deals—and the

present market is steady although very quiet. The very low

sales of gray forge have ceased and prices are somewhat stiffer Pittsburg sellers are relatively weaker than those in the valley, but nothing less than $9 is quoted. Foundry buy- ng has been light. Connellsville coke is selling at $1.65. Quotations are made as follows

Bessemer, valley $ ).50 Bessemer delivered Pittsburg District ae to 1

No. 1 Foundry...... : 10.75 to 10.64 No. 2 Foundry. to 10.4 No. 3 Foundry a Gray Forge

Bittets.—The large buying of two weeks ago has again lled up the books of steel mills. Business since has been steady but in small lots. It is now stated at Shenango and Mahoning valley mills, as well as at the Pittsburg mills, that books are n good s ipe for the first rte On the other iand, Wheeling district mills are said to be running very close to sp ition A sa Or 2 tons of | ets 5 re ported, at $15.25, Pittsburg mill, but 1otations of $15 have been made Che n et oted at $15 to $15.25 maker mill. Sheet bat ery firm at $17 to $17.2

PLAT! The December tonnage of plates will probably be heavier than that of November although not as large as the October tonnage. Inquiries for next year are coming in ata rate unheard of at t eason of the year. Mills are quot- ing: Bessemer and open-hearth tank, 1c; shell, 1.10c; and flange, 1.20

STRUCTURAL MATERIAI For the time being, structural business is very small and one local mill is idle for lack of orders. Onthe other hand inquiry for structural shapes of all kinds—generally light at this season—is heavier than

for many months, the active season in the fall not excepted.

Locally bids have been asked for on an addition to the Penn-

December 30, 1897] THE IRON

f

sylvania Tube Works, that will use upwards of 1,000 tons Ol!

angles, sheets, and beams Beams, up to 15 inches, are firn at 1.10c pending a meeting at the Holland House, New Y:

on Tuesday, of the six beam manufacturers whom it is planned to include in a revived beam pool. The plan as talked of isa matter of apportioning outputs rather than any a

tempt to maintain prices above that ruling to-day. An ad

o be improbab e

are guoted at r.osc: tees and zees, 1.2

vance over 1.1oc on beams is thought here Universal

plates

angles, 1.10c. The contract for plain material for the new Manhattan Viaduct, New York, was awarded on Tuesday, to the Carnegie Steel Co, Ltd. The work calls for 6,00 Material for another similar viaduct in New York is now at the bidding stage.

SHEETs.—The meeting of the Sheet Manufacturers’ Associa- tion last week fixed no scale of prices further than the nominal base of 2.03c for No. 28. There is no difficulty in getting the 2. osc for No 28, at present and 2 roc has beet on small business. Inquiry is increasingly heavy for next year, without any pressure to sell. Eastern inquiries continue

heavy. For galvanized sheet quotations are made at 80 and

5 per cent off list

IRON AND STEEL SKELI Skelp mills generally are closed

dergoing repairs and business is hight. (Grooved steel skelp, g5c to.97'4c; sheared steel skelp, 1.02'4%c to I1.05C; grooved iron skelp, 1.10c to 1:124%c; sheared iron skelp, 1.17'%c to I. 20C.

O_p MareriAL.—The selling movement in billets and sheet

bars has stiffened asking prices for all kinds of scrap and

further increased the gap between asking and offered prices.

Old steel rails are quoted at $11 and sales are reported at $10,

gross; No. 1 wrought has sold at $11 net, cast scrap at $9.25

gross; and car wheels at $10.50, gross.

Bars.—Bar mills are getting close to order books again and the quotations of .g5c on steel bars has been resumed in some quarters. The larger mills still quote 1c but prices lower than this have been made in the week. Below .gs5c no sales can be authenticated. Inquiry for steel bars is heavy, nota-

bly from the East, and business is in sight that will occupy

the mills to their utmost. One large Eastern contract is

now pending. In bar iron there is a scramble for business

both by valley and Pittsburg mills On common, .gsc is

juoted and on branded all-muck 1 25c to 1.30¢ RAILROAD AND TRACK MATERIAI Rail business now pend- Southern

Thom

Eastern an

ing in very heavy. The Lake Shore & Michigan

Ry. has bought a good tonnage to be rolled at Edgar

> } , Both

son, deliveries running during the year. Western roads are negotiating but so far there has been no $18, Bessemer

} | Se clash over prices and the market is firm at

Demand for light sections and relaying stock is not so large. The girder mill at Homestead is about ready for rolling. On

track material we quote: Iron track bolts, 1.65c¢ to 1.70c; steel

spikes, 1.45¢ to 1.55c; splice bars, 1.10c to 1.15c; links and pins, 1.15c to 1.200.

SPELTE! Spelte: has ju ted and sales are report d $3.5 and $3.90

Ferro M ANESI For so per cent domestic ferro-man ganese, $47 and $47.50 is quoted

Pipes AND TUBES Demand for all sorts of pipe LS

usually heavy for a holiday week. Merchant pipe

the weak feature and oil country goods are as noticeably ac tive On merchant pipe the association discount ioted be low are now subject to a further discount of from ¢ to 10 pel cent Butt weld black, 72 per cent off; lap weld black, 78 pé:

butt weld galvanized, 67 per cent off; lap weld gal

vanil ed, 70 per cent oft lhe second discount is 10 per cent

on car load lots. Discounts on merchant boiler tubes are as

follows: 2'/-inch and smaller, 72'4 per cent off inch and larger, 75 per cent off.

IN OTHER MARKETS. [SPECIALLY REPORTED FOR THE IRON TRADE REVIEW.) The holiday season instead of hurting business had Inquiries have been coming in at a good rate for the

Cincinnat seems rather to have a stimulating effect upon it past ten days and the volume of sales is steadily increasing. There are but few large orders, the tonnage being mainly made up of car load and small lots, say not to exceed 100 tons

At the present time a number of large buyers are in the mar-

TRADE REVIEW. 5

ket evidently trying to hammer prices down, but the Birming

ham iron masters have been holding rm at the concessior

they made early in the month; that is, $ for gray forge and $ for N indr ire the I pr r

‘here is a gro eeling that ther " irt b ng

ovement ear » the ea in | " t +) + lis ot ; ; }

lat is } ) i ow dea w man he " t T ww i para I time the »>b in whe n It is belie it t mption )

ibout an ¢ al fe g dno mat re expected o la \\V lrop ota ) ce . iron to corre spon more close] vith ew f ss f furnaces most anxious to sel Southert ‘ke No.1 foun < "cs t S10: N fn ndrv < th No " = 25 to $0.45 gray torgs So ttle ~ to & No. 1 soft, So to SI No. 2 ft t Ha y Rock charcoal, No. 1, $14 to $1 I arcoal, } $12.50 to $1 lac oO uunty lvery N So) to & Standard Georgia car wheel, $14 to $1

rhe opinion is quite general that there will bs

Bu ffalo.

i strong buying movement throug! the C ntry beg ling soon alte la I | s district « to partic ate 1 tie noveme I ct rye stocks and falling es at the en t ear are § at the decrease in stocks Lic t to ac npany the h , ? tinn | , } y ; r et } neavy on clion urnaces S dais ¢ ir \ s! ying on orders already entere: New ders te numerous, though generally for nall a s. One O- ducer reports more business taken for December this year than in any December for five years back We uote below on the cash basis f. o cars Buffalo No. 1 strong foundry, $11.25; No. 2 strong foundry, $1075; Ohio strong softener: No. 1, $11.75; No. 2, $11.2 y silvery, No. 1, $14: Southern soft, No S11.7 No Sit

he interest in the 1 ket shown b irger buys : en tione last week, | cont ed and to a cert extent creased As t it me busin een clo but price have bee rather ) 5 favo d ere 18 a weak ening in the market S Ct pare wit the ea part oO the T mnth tro 2 to ent ) | x | Ss ) C eraliv co ceded that prices are any lower b ) isional sale by some mill anxious to fill its order boo 1OW t > a te l

a Se ee ee ency is toward lower rather than hig value

lhe inquiry through the East is considerably heavier that in the West, but the large number of plates to be disposed of n the East by the mills and dealers s the ef tof keeping prices down to the bottom not I vorted that yme large contract ive bee lose }

It is understoo hat a ting of tl! Tin Plate Man AC turers’ Association will be held in Columbus on Wednesday the 2oth, but no nbd tion « ide a t dk on- sideration After tl tistacto vo ot Y tie mens agret i ast yea obpabie t es i m Ww 1] vo , 1 rr nye ry >? 1 tle is a complished in the former associatior in { resuit, a r as many of the mills was concerned, was very unsatisfactory so it was claimed, bad faith being charged against several of the ] reer mi le Ihe iverav’ auotatio ot , il

b. Pittsburg, and | ana district is fo \ HARCOAI \ LX : . .

Lisvane Grad $3.4: $4.20 Calland Grade , 3. 4.35 COKE TIN IC, 108 lb Basis weight $2.9

100 lb 2 95 lb 2.80

IC, 216 lb., 20 x 28 $s..0°

200 |b : c.f [ue oftices of the Inland Steel Co., heretofore at the worl

of the company, at Chicago Heights, III ave been remove

to 1227-1229 Marquette

6 THE IRON

TRADE REVIEW.

[December 30, 1897

THE IRON TRADE REVIEW

DEVOTED TO [RON AND STEEL MANUFACTURE, FOUNDRY AND MACHINERY TRADES.

PUBLISHED EVEKY THURSDAY BY

THE IRON TRADE REVIEW CO., CLEVELAND, OHIO.

CLEVELAND, 27 VINCENT STREET:

G. H GARDNER President. A. I. Frnp.iey, Editor.

CHICAGO: PITTSBURG: 1142 MONADNOCK BLOCK. B. M. GARDNER, Associate Editor

and Western Manager.

807 TRADESMEN’S BUILDING

JAMES R. MILLS, JR., Manager

Subscription (strictly in advance), $3 perannum. Advertising Rates Furnished on Application.

The Cleveland News Co. will supply the trade with THE IRON TRADE REVIEW, through the regular channels of the American News Co.

ENTERED AT THE POST OFFICE AT CLEVELAND, 0O.,AS SECOND CLASS MATTER DECEMBER 30, 1897.

A BRIGHT OUTLOOK. The the

greater confidence than it had in looking forward

iron trade faces new year with far

to 1897 from the closing days of 1896. Then all The billet had gone into wreckage in early December; the

was uncertainty. and wire nail pools Merchant Bar Iron Association had little more than a nominal existence; the leading factors in the rail agreement gave some premonition of the desperate struggle that came a few weeks later; the acquisi- tion of mines by the Carnegie Steel Co. cast a shadow of apprehension over all the plans of less favored producers; the revival expected from the November election result, and in anticipation of the actual change in administration in March, had not come; railroads were holding back and the prospect for rail tonnage in the new year was any- thing but encouraging. feeling everywhere prevalent

To-day, not only is the that the and steel trade has passed through the worst that any

iron

combination of calamitous causes could bring upon it, but that it is entering upon a period of unparal- leled consumption, with conditions in other indus- tires such as to contribute steadily to its prosperity. The pool wreckage of 1896 and i897 is out of the way; values are on so low a level that the tendency will be up rather than down; and at the same time the fact that been seen in the past few months has made so little

so enormous a consumption as has change in prices, is indicative of the evenness of

values that may be looked for in the months just

ahead. That a year opening so inauspiciously, closes with so much that is encouraging, so far as volume is concerned, is certainly stimulating to op- timism; and faith in the future should not be diffi- cult when so much that is so substantial appeals to

sight.

In the paper of Mr. H. J. Lewis, read before the Western Pennsylvania Mining Institute last week and printed elsewhere in this issue, is a suggestion that bears in an important way upon the future of

the railroads engaged in the ore and fuel traffic be- the the valleys, Wheeling and Pittsburg. There is at pres-

tween Lake Erie and furnace districts of ent an excess of the ore movement from lake ports over the return movement of fuel; particularly in the intervals of navigation seasons is the cost of lack of return to the economy out of the present situation by

operation enhanced by the loads The railroads have tried secure largest

working

>

for a maximum ore tonnage in navigation time, to

balance the heavy movement of coal to the lake, and in the winter to have as little ore as possible to move in cars that must go back empty. The rebate

on ore loaded directly into cars from vessels works

1

to the above end, leading furnace companies to pro

tO carry

the ¢

rood s

vide greater stockpile room so as

portion of their winter’s supply. With reat

increase in the total ore movement, due to nev

Pittsbu